German Researchers Using NiOX To Improve Cell Efficiency

Germany’s KIT Researchers Work With Nickle Oxide Layer To Increase Power Conversion Efficiency For Perovskite Solar PV Cells
10:25 AM (Beijing Time) - 18. July 2019
2019_097_Hocheffiziente Solarzellen-PNG

KIT in Germany is working on different processes to improve the efficiency of perovskite solar cells using a layer of nickel oxide (NiOx). The researchers say the NiOX based layer is inexpensive and also less sensitive to temperatures of over 70°C. (Photo Credit: Tobias Abzieher, KIT)

Key Takeaways

  • KIT in Germany is working on different processes to improve the efficiency of perovskite solar cells using a layer of nickel oxide (NiOx)
  • They developed hole conductor layer for perovskite solar cells using NiOX depositing it over a large area to lead to ‘record breaking efficiencies in the solar cells’
  • Fully vacuum-processed perovskite solar cells led to 16.1% conversion efficiency and with inkjet printing the efficiency reached 18.5%
  • Team is now working on scalable manufacturing processes to bring perovskite PV from lab to factories

Germany’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has developed a ‘novel, highly efficient’ hole conductor layer for perovskite solar cells using nickel oxide (NiOx) to be deposited over a large area that it claims leads to record breaking efficiencies in these solar cells. Using the vacuum process technique of electron beam evaporation, the team was able to homogenously place metal oxide deposits on a substrate by means of vapor deposition over a large area.

The NiOx based layer is not only inexpensive but also less sensitive to temperatures of more than 70°C, claim the researchers.

For fully vacuum-processed perovskite solar cells, the team achieved efficiencies of up to 16.1%. In addition to this technique, the researchers deposited the absorber by inkjet printing which created a ‘world record’ with 18.5% efficiency level. “Currently, development is dominated by deposition by spin coating for which efficiencies of more than 24% have been achieved. However, these can practically not be transferred to large areas,” said Tobias Abzieher a doctoral student at the Institute of Light Technology at KIT.

The team is working on scalable manufacturing processes to bring perovskite PV from the lab to the fab.

Their research is supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), the initiation and networking support of the Helmholtz Association and the Karlsruhe School of Optics & Photonics (KSOP).

Anu Bhambhani

Anu Bhambhani is the Senior News Editor of TaiyangNews

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Anu Bhambhani