10 MW Storage System For New Delhi

AES India And Mitsubishi Commence Work On 10 MW Utility-Scale Energy Storage System For Tata Power-DDL In Delhi - The First Project Of This Kind In India
05:55 PM (Beijing Time) - 26. January 2018

Key Takeaways

  • Construction work has commenced on a 10 MW utility-scale energy storage system in Delhi, the first project of its kind in India on this scale
  • As a joint project between AES India and Mitsubishi Corp, the two companies will own the Advancion Storage Solution
  • It will be set up at a substation in Rohini operated by Tata Power-DDL and will boost reliability of power supply for its more than 7 million customers in the region of Delhi
  • Tata Power-DDL hopes to use it as platform to demonstrate energy storage as a critical distribution asset and help balance distributed energy resources, including rooftop solar

The Indian subsidiary of US-based power company AES Corp. has begun construction of a 10 MW utility-scale energy storage system in Delhi. The first such system in India of this capacity is a joint project between AES India and Mitsubishi Corp. The two companies will own the Advancion Storage Solution. This technology is being supplied by Fluence, an energy storage technology and services company owned by Siemens and AES.

The Advancion Solution is being deployed in the Rohini area of Delhi, at a substation operated by Tata Power Delhi Distribution Ltd. (Tata Power-DDL).

The first of its kind, it will help to create a business case for the deployment of storage in India, to address challenges in the areas of peak load management, system flexibility, frequency regulation and reliability on the network,” stated Praveer Sinha, CEO and managing director of Tata Power-DDL. “This project will provide a platform to demonstrate energy storage as a critical distribution asset and help to balance distributed energy resources, including rooftop solar,” he added. The 10 MW solution will increase reliability of power for more than 7 million Tata Power-DDL customers in Delhi, according to a company statement.

Energy storage is a key factor that can ensure the success and seamless integration of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind into the grid. However, it has still one disadvantage – its rather high costs, unless its services are appropriately remunerated.

Elsewhere in the world, utility-scale energy storage technology is gaining the attention of investors and companies alike. In September 2017, Swiss utility EKZ announced investment in a 18 MW energy storage system with storage capacity of around 7.5 MWh (see Swiss Utility Invests In Energy Storage System). In December last year, Tesla commissioned a 129 MWh battery system to store power from a 100 MW Neoen wind power plant connected to the grid, making Australia home to the biggest lithium-ion battery globally.

Earlier this month, a Navigant Research report stated that the energy storage for renewables integration (ESRI) market is likely to grow to an annual revenue of more than $23 billion by 2026 (see RES Energy Storage $23Bn Market By 2026).

In India, meanwhile, government-owned National Thermal Power Corp. (NTPC) and Solar Energy Corporation of India Ltd. (SECI) have been launching tenders for PV plants along with battery storage requirements, but the pace is yet to pick up. And these plants are yet to come to fruition as the result of cost issues (see SECI Cancels Nearly 1 GW Tender Capacity).

Anu Bhambhani

Anu Bhambhani is the Senior News Editor of TaiyangNews

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Anu Bhambhani